The ideas expressed in Notes from Underground become central to all of Dostoevsky

The ideas expressed - The ideas expressed in Notes from Underground become central to all of Dostoevsky's later novels As expressed in the

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Unformatted text preview: The ideas expressed in Notes from Underground become central to all of Dostoevsky's later novels. As expressed in the Commentaries, Dostoevsky was writing partly about man's sense of freedom, the freedom to choose, to be able to have the right to step over obstacles. The right of man to have freedom and to be able to reject security in favor of the freedom to choose has its greatest expression in Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov . In the scene where the Grand inquisitor confronts Jesus and says to Jesus that man prefers security to the freedom to choose that Jesus offers man, we have the greatest culmination of Dostoevsky's ideas upon freedom versus security. At one point the Underground Man says that twice two makes four, this is a scientific fact, but man does not always function merely by scientific fact. For Dostoevsky, the rational part of a man's being does not always function merely by scientific fact....
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course ENG 3309 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Texas State.

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