Miller bases the play on the historical account of the Salem witch trials

Miller bases the play on the historical account of the Salem witch trials

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Miller bases the play on the historical account of the Salem witch trials. In particular he focuses on  the discovery of several young girls and a slave playing in the woods, conjuring — or attempting to  conjure — spirits from the dead. Rather than suffer severe and inevitable punishment for their  actions, the girls accused other inhabitants of Salem of practicing witchcraft. Ironically, the girls  avoided punishment by accusing others of the very things of which they were guilty. This desperate  and perhaps childish finger-pointing resulted in mass paranoia and an atmosphere of fear in which  everyone was a potential witch. As the number of arrests increased, so did the distrust within the  Salem community. A self-perpetuating cycle of distrust, accusation, arrest, and conviction emerged.  By the end of 1692, the Salem court had convicted and executed nineteen men and women. Miller creates an atmosphere and mood within the play reminiscent of the historical period and of 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Ask a homework question - tutors are online