Scene 4 also introduces greed and the quest for power or authority as the two other major themes of

Scene 4 also introduces greed and the quest for power or authority as the two other major themes of

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Scene 4 also introduces greed and the quest for power or authority as the two other major themes of  the play. Parris' argument with Proctor and Corey reveals that money causes many disputes within  Salem. Tension arises when Proctor accuses Parris of concerning himself more with material gain  than ministering to the inhabitants of Salem. Proctor's anger is consistent with his character because he lives according to the morals and work  ethic described in the Bible. This does not mean Proctor is perfect. His adulterous affair with Abigail  presents a major flaw, but Proctor recognizes his sin and suffers greatly under the weight of his guilt.  Parris' haggling over his contract, salary, and provisions disgusts Proctor. Proctor believes a minister  obsessed with obtaining material goods — such as golden candlesticks, rather than pewter ones —  cannot truly serve God or minister to others. On the other hand, one can understand Parris' concern over job security. Proctor criticizes Parris' 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online