Since this novel is essentially poetic

Since this novel is essentially poetic - Since this novel...

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Unformatted text preview: Since this novel is essentially poetic, the opening chapter is not a narrative but instead sets a certain mood and atmosphere. And as with Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath, there will be numerous intercalary chapters interspersed throughout the novel. Thus, we hear first about Ixopo, the town nearest Stephen Kumalo's village of Ndotsheni, on the east coast of South Africa, forty miles from the Indian Ocean and fifty miles from the border of Basutoland. It lies on a ridge of land between the Umkomaas River and the Umzimkulu River, which flow from the mountains of Basutoland into the sea. Intimated in this first chapter is a strong reverence for the soil, which reminds one of Steinbeck's treatment of the land in certain passages in Grapes of Wrath. The emphasis on the difference between the shod and the unshod infers that the shod condition divorces humanity from the soil. between the shod and the unshod infers that the shod condition divorces humanity from the soil....
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