Some critics have seen this first chapter as being symbolic of the relative positions of the whites

Some critics have seen this first chapter as being symbolic of the relative positions of the whites

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Some critics have seen this first chapter as being symbolic of the relative positions of the whites and  the natives. That is, geographically, the whites live above the natives on the best land; the natives  live below on the barren land. Besides the possible symbolism of the relative positions and qualities  of the lands owned by whites and blacks, there is another source of symbolism in this chapter: when  the soil of the hills is red and is washed into the rivers through erosion, it colors the rivers blood red,  as if the land were one great open wound. Africa bleeds because of this unjust distribution of land  and human rights. The picture given of the disintegration of Stephen's family (his loss of contact with his sister  Gertrude, his brother John, and his son Absalom) shows the erosion of African society, the erosion  symbolized in Chapter 1 by the erosion of the land.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online