The chapter slowly passes from the description of the exterior

The chapter slowly passes from the description of the exterior

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The chapter slowly passes from the description of the exterior, physical world to the interior of  Kumalo's mind, in which we discover his fears about his sister and about his son, and his qualms  about catching a bus in the large city. Stephen's fears of Johannesburg are a part of his inexperience  in coping with the white man's world, which for this simple man is a complicated world, full of traps  and dangers, while his own area is simple and natural. When Stephen's friend asks him to find Sibeko's daughter in the suburb of Springs, we are reminded  that what has happened to Stephen's family is not an isolated case, but part of the general breaking  up of African life and the disintegration of native family life. This sort of parallelism is a device Paton  uses a great deal. As soon as Kumalo is in the outside world, there is a significant change in his actions. Whereas in 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online