The fact that Hale gives Proctor the opportunity to explain each of the incriminating items is an im

The fact that Hale gives Proctor the opportunity to explain each of the incriminating items is an im

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Unformatted text preview: The fact that Hale gives Proctor the opportunity to explain each of the incriminating items is an important testament to Hale's fairness and directly contrasts with what happened in Act I, Scene 5. In Act I, Scene 5, the inhabitants of Salem provide a list of evidence that Hale takes at face value and fails to analyze individually. As a result, Hale declares witchcraft without attempting to examine any of the evidence. Here, however, Hale allows Proctor to explain his actions. Although Hale disapproves of Proctor's actions particularly his refusal to baptize his son because of feelings toward Parris Hale realizes that Proctor is not an evil man. Tension also arises in Scene 3 between the Proctors and Hale over issues of faith. Both Elizabeth and Proctor refuse to believe that Rebecca could be involved with witchcraft, and the accusation...
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