The language that Paton uses in his novel is extremely simple

The language that Paton uses in his novel is extremely simple

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The language that Paton uses in his novel is extremely simple, except of course for the words in Zulu  and Afrikaans (the Dutch-derived language of parts of South Africa) that he uses to help establish  the scene. The simplicity of language is meant to help convey the fact that Stephen Kumalo is a  simple man used to plain words and plain living and uncomplicated ideas. It also helps convey his  religiousness, for the language, not just the words themselves, is that of the King James version of  the Bible. Stephen's religion is simple; he obviously has read the Bible so many times that he thinks  and speaks in its style. Partly this has come about because so many of the schools where Africans  first learned English were missionary schools, where teaching religion was as important as teaching  arithmetic, but Stephen has gone on to reinforce this Bible-like usage of language. This use of Biblical style also fits in with the number of Biblical names in the novel, such names as 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online