The novel is not only a study of social problems but also a study in human relationships

The novel is not - The novel is not only a study of social problems but also a study in human relationships Kumalo interested at first only in

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Unformatted text preview: The novel is not only a study of social problems but also a study in human relationships. Kumalo, interested at first only in reuniting his own family, comes to understand the greater problems facing his race. In such a novel as this, the absorbing social message must be realized by vivid, human characters in order to make the theme memorable. Many of the ideas of the novel are presented through the suffering of Kumalo. In fact, through suffering, several persons undergo a significant change. James Jarvis, through the suffering he undergoes as a result of the death of his son, learns to understand his son, whom he had not previously really known. Furthermore, he comes to a better understanding of his own self, and finally he develops an understanding of the social situation of the entire country. As a result of this suffering and consequent understanding, he becomes a reformed man and continues the work begun by his...
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This note was uploaded on 12/08/2011 for the course ENG 3550 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '09 term at Texas State.

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