The technique of these chapters is to present the general picture of the court in detail

The technique of these chapters is to present the general picture of the court in detail

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The technique of these chapters is to present the general picture of the court in detail, describing all  the various aspects of the room. Later, the author will go into the dramatic trial scene in which  Absalom is tried for the murder of Arthur Jarvis. Paton, who often brings the reader to a close  emotional understanding of the African situation, reverses his technique in this chapter and instead  creates an objective distance from his reader in order to present the courtroom scene. Instead of  making it emotional, he presents it quietly. In other words, it is not his purpose to arouse any undue  emotion over the trial itself: Absalom is guilty and must be found so. The intent is to get past this and  investigate Kumalo's and Jarvis' reactions to the situation that brought about this unnecessary crime. At the end of Chapter 22, there is the first recognition by Kumalo of Jarvis. In the courtroom, Kumalo 
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