This use of Biblical style also fits in with the number of Biblical names in the novel

This use of Biblical style also fits in with the number of Biblical names in the novel

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: This use of Biblical style also fits in with the number of Biblical names in the novel, such names as Absalom, Peter, and John, and helps give them meaning. Besides being a reflection of Stephen's religiousness and simplicity, this Biblical style gives the novel an air of restraint and universality. It is a terrible and dramatic story that is told, the story of a family, a tribe, and a nation slipping into decline, crime, and murder. But the author does not want it to be just a melodrama that is good for a few hours of exciting reading. He prefers to play down the dramatic events and play up the feelings of its two principal participants, Stephen Kumalo and James Jarvis, so that the reader has a feeling not just of sympathy but of empathy with them. Empathy is the capacity to put yourself in someone else's place, to say, "What if this happened to me, or to my family, how would I feel then?" He wants else's place, to say, "What if this happened to me, or to my family, how would I feel then?...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online