Abraxas becomes the second important symbol of this novel

Abraxas becomes the second important symbol of this novel -...

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Unformatted text preview: Abraxas becomes the second important symbol of this novel. Abraxas is Demian's answer to the previously stated problem of a God who represents an arbitrarily selected half of the world. Abraxas is a deity who serves to unite the entire world, the light and the dark, the godly and the devilish. He does not represent either; rather, he is the affirmation of both. Sinclair experiences an intensification of his sexual drive. His longing for meaningful love seems hopeless. Sinclair again retreats into his dream world, which has become as active during his waking hours as during his sleep. A new dream occurs which he explicitly and emphatically identifies as the most significant dream of his life. In this dream, Sinclair is entering his father's house beneath the heraldic hawk on the escutcheon. His mother is walking toward him with outstretched arms. As they are about to embrace, she His mother is walking toward him with outstretched arms....
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 1310 taught by Professor Pilkington during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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