It is at this point that the larger and most important aspect of the story becomes externalized

It is at this point that the larger and most important aspect of the story becomes externalized

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Unformatted text preview: It is at this point that the larger and most important aspect of the story becomes externalized. Throughout the novel, Sinclair and Demian have been compulsively concerned with themselves. Possibly they have been viewed as very egocentric. But it is only now that the several apparent paradoxes can be resolved. Demian now reveals the purpose of those with the "mark of Cain" when he visualizes the aftermath of the forthcoming chaos. It will revolve around those with the "mark," those who will determine the future. After the war, there will be no more oppression of the individual will, and the further development of the human species will once again be possible. Demian states that this goal, the ultimate perfection of the human race, is one expressed by both Jesus and Nietzsche. Now it is clear that Hesse has made a parallel in these two diverse doctrines, and the fact Nietzsche....
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 1310 taught by Professor Pilkington during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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