The significance of the increased mention of dreams and dreamlike states cannot be overstressed

The significance of the increased mention of dreams and dreamlike states cannot be overstressed

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Unformatted text preview: The significance of the increased mention of dreams and dreamlike states cannot be overstressed. As the story progresses, it becomes increasingly difficult to differentiate between what is reality and what is not reality because of Sinclair's constant dreaming. Ultimately, the question of the reality of Demian himself, as well as his mother, arises. This problem will be discussed later. Demian's next involvement in the story occurs while Kromer is once again terrorizing Sinclair, this time under Demian's analytical eyes. After Kromer's departure, it is only a matter of minutes and a few words until Demian is able to ascertain the reason for Emil's fear of Kromer. Emil is both repelled and fascinated by Demian's apparent psychic power. At this point, Sinclair notes that Demian seems to know him and understand him better than he does himself. He further adds that when Demian to know him and understand him better than he does himself....
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