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All these ironies and the many more that are to be found throughout the play add up to the great iro

All these ironies and the many more that are to be found throughout the play add up to the great iro

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All these ironies and the many more that are to be found throughout the play add up to the great  irony that appearance is not always truth, and truth is not always clothed in appropriate appearances.  The eternal nature of this theme is one explanation for the continued success of the play. Another  reason could be the suitability of the ending to the characters. Imagine Cyrano as a husband. Imagine Roxane as a wife. Their romance, with Cyrano playing the  part of the  chevalier servant , could go on for all their lives; their marriage would have been  miserable. But Cyrano did not really want to marry Roxane. She was lovely, and he loved her for  exactly the same reasons that Roxane loved Christian. Christian is the only major character in the  play that makes any attempt at being honest. He wants very much for Roxane to love him for himself. 
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