The classical tradition of French drama was formalized in the seventeenth century

The classical tradition of French drama was formalized in the seventeenth century

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The classical tradition of French drama was formalized in the seventeenth century, and the  eighteenth century was an imitation of the seventeenth. During this time, the plays were usually  centered on characters from history — most often Greek or Roman history or literature — and were  of a psychological nature. Any violent or shocking action, such as a battle, was simply told about and  never re-enacted on stage. Aristotle's unities were closely observed — that is, the action took place  within a time span of no more than 24 hours, in one geographical location, and concerned one main  character. The state of French drama during the nineteenth century was as tumultuous as was the state of  French politics. Victor Hugo broke the restrictive chains of French classicism with the famous  "Preface" to  Cromwell  (1827), the manifesto of romanticism. Over the next 25 years, his dramas 
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This note was uploaded on 12/08/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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