The state of French drama during the nineteenth century was as tumultuous as was the state of French

The state of French drama during the nineteenth century was as tumultuous as was the state of French

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The state of French drama during the nineteenth century was as tumultuous as was the state of  French politics. Victor Hugo broke the restrictive chains of French classicism with the famous  "Preface" to  Cromwell  (1827), the manifesto of romanticism. Over the next 25 years, his dramas  employed action as well as other dramatic devices denied to the classicists. During this period of  literary and political upheaval, the schools of romanticism, naturalism, symbolism, and realism  developed in France. Yet  Cyrano de Bergerac  does not really fit into any of these categories. Some  have considered it a revival or culmination of romantic drama, but it did not truly revive this school  nor continue it.  Cyrano  was presented in 1897 for the first time, half a century after Hugo's last effort,  and is not a part of any school or movement. Rather, 
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This note was uploaded on 12/08/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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