Cather wrote Death Comes for the Archbishop following two contemporary novels

Cather wrote Death Comes for the Archbishop following two contemporary novels

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Unformatted text preview: Cather wrote Death Comes for the Archbishop following two contemporary novels, A Lost Lady and The Professor's House, as well as a novella, My Mortal Enemy. The preceding fiction reveals Cather's perception of the increasing materialism of American society and disillusion with Jazz Age lapses of morality. Similar to other such Modernist writers as T.S. Eliot and David Jones, Cather perceived that "the world broke in two in 1922 or thereabouts," as she wrote in the preface to her 1936 collection of essays Not Under Forty. In another similarity to Eliot and Jones, Cather attempted to counter the relaxed morality of the era through religious faith. Raised Baptist, she converted to the Episcopalian church. It is the belief of some critics that Cather stopped short of converting to Roman Catholicism due to her Protestant roots. Nevertheless, Catholicism due to her Protestant roots....
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