Chapter 24 briefly goes back to describe the preceding evening

Chapter 24 briefly goes back to describe the preceding evening

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 24 briefly goes back to describe the preceding evening's party from Homer's point of view,  and it also portrays Homer's near-madness that resulted from the party's aftermath. Returning to  Homer's house the next day, Tod finds Homer in a trance and learns that Faye and her friends have  vanished. Homer's plan to return to Iowa suggests that the plot of the novel is winding down,  although West has fresh violence in store. When Tod gets Homer to communicate what has  happened and how he feels, he sees that Homer's emotions are more tangled than ever. Homer's  hands are playing their usual agitated tricks, and now that Homer must face the truth about Faye, the  restiveness of his hands implies a potential for destruction as much as a struggle with his repressed  sexuality. Homer's semi-coherent story to Tod picks up last night's events. Homer is still angry that Tod called 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online