Homer -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Homer's first name suggests that he is a misplaced hometown boy and points towards his plan to  return home at the novel's end. His last name emphasizes his simplicity. This forty-year-old retired  hotel bookkeeper, however, is not an ordinary, simple homeboy. He is a grotesque figure of  repressed and dangerous sexuality. Many critics have noted his similarity to Wing Biddlebaum, the  protagonist of Sherwood Anderson's story "Hands," in the novel  Winesburg, Ohio.  Wing Biddlebaum  has been a schoolteacher who was almost lynched because he could not keep his hands from  wavering over his male students; he lived and died in social isolation. Quite possibly, West borrowed  the symbolic, aggressive sexual wavering of Homer's hands from this source, but Anderson's  character is more sensitive and receives a more sympathetic treatment. Homer Simpson is infantile, automaton-like, and repressed, but the reader does not learn how he got 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online