In 1822 -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In 1822, John Dickens was transferred to London, but debts continued to pile up, and the family was  forced to sell household items in order to pay some of the creditors. Young Charles made frequent  trips to the pawnshop, but eventually his father was arrested and sent to debtors' prison, and at the  age of twelve, he was sent to work in a blacking warehouse, where he pasted labels on bottles for  six shillings a week. This experience was degrading for the young boy, and Dickens later wrote: "No words can express  the secret agony of my soul. I felt my early hopes of growing up to be a learned and distinguished  man, crushed in my breast." The situation is an exact parallel to David Copperfield's plight at the  wine warehouse. Even after his father was released from prison and the family inherited some  money, his mother wanted him to continue with his job. Later, for two and a half years, Dickens attended school at Wellington House Academy, and then in 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online