Latour has come to love the New World more than the Old

Latour has come to love the New World more than the Old -...

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Unformatted text preview: Latour has come to love the New World more than the Old, and he prepares to die in his adopted homeland. Ducrot and Magdalena look after the Archbishop as his health continues to fail. He ponders the hardships of the missionaries in New Mexico, comparing them to the deprivations of St. Paul and other early Christians. He considers the hardships of the missionaries to be greater due to the greater distances they have traveled from their homelands. Latour remembers a story another priest had told him about Father Junipero. Junipero had traveled with a companion across a vast desert, arriving at a monastery in good health with no provisions. The pair relates the story of the gracious hospitality of a young Mexican family consisting of a venerable man, his beautiful wife, an infant, and a pet lamb. Junipero and his companion eat well, sleep, and awaken to a table of food. The family, however, is gone. The brothers recognize the sleep, and awaken to a table of food....
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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