The Hollywood mob consists of the same desperate watchers mentioned frequently throughout the novel

The Hollywood mob consists of the same desperate watchers mentioned frequently throughout the novel

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Unformatted text preview: The Hollywood mob consists of the same desperate watchers mentioned frequently throughout the novel. Now they are actually promised a chance to see their dreamland heroes. They are angry, poor, bored, cheated, and violent, and at last they get a chance to release their resentments. They do this largely by assaulting one another, and, at the same time, they denounce the lewdness which they love. Thus they can talk murderously of lynching perverts as they press up against one another and enjoy talking about sexual assault. The police put up a facade of politeness, but privately they beat up arrested people. When Homer stumbles in a trance into this mob, on his way to the railroad station to go home to Iowa, Tod acts more protectively of Homer than at any time earlier. But he is powerless to save Homer. His good intentions are not enough. The mob atmosphere makes it impossible for Tod to restrain or redirect Homer, and the appearance of Adore Loomis seals both Adore's and Homer's...
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The Hollywood mob consists of the same desperate watchers mentioned frequently throughout the novel

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