Archbishop Latour retires to a small estate four miles north of Santa Fe

Archbishop Latour retires to a small estate four miles north of Santa Fe

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Unformatted text preview: Archbishop Latour retires to a small estate four miles north of Santa Fe, which he has purchased to live in during the last years of his life. The estate features an apricot tree that is more than two- hundred years old and that still bears delicious fruit. He cultivates an orchard and a garden. He instructs new priests in the Spanish language as well as in the character and traditions of the people of the diocese. Latour counsels the new priests to plant fruit trees in their parishes in order to balance the Mexican diet. He quotes the Catholic philosopher Blaise Pascal: "man was lost and saved in a garden." He cultivates wildflowers, including verbena, which covers the hillside in many shades of purple, the Episcopal color. In January 1889, the Archbishop is caught in a rainstorm, subsequently takes ill, and requests permission to return to Santa Fe to die. Bernard, a young priest who shares Latour's temperament permission to return to Santa Fe to die....
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