The seventh chapter provides Deerslayer with the critical test of his courage

The seventh chapter provides Deerslayer with the critical test of his courage

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Unformatted text preview: The seventh chapter provides Deerslayer with the critical test of his courage, and he comes rightly into his own as the hero of Cooper's romance. Natty Bumppo, for the first time, kills an Indian — a fellow human being. "Such was the commencement of a career in forest exploits," writes Cooper, "that afterward rendered this man, in his way, and under the limits of his habits and opportunities, as renowned as many a hero whose name has adorned the pages of works more celebrated than legends simple as ours can ever become." Natty has, until now, proved his worth in the councils of war and discussions with the Hutters and Hurry Harry, but he must reply to the latter's doubts about his ability to resort to violence when necessary. Two characteristics emerge in Natty's trial: the chivalric or medieval ideal, set in the American forest, and the Christian training he has received during his youth. Natty truly stands out as an epic hero of and the Christian training he has received during his youth....
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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