Cooper devotes several pages to the important trial of the

Cooper devotes several pages to the important trial of the...

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Unformatted text preview: Cooper devotes several pages to the important trial of the "first warpath," and he analyzes carefully the reactions of Deerslayer during and after the fatal confrontation with the Mingo. The symbol of Deerslayer's emergence into manhood or a new stage of his career is the dying Indian's complimentary naming of his victor, Hawkeye. After the Indian dies, Deerslayer is visibly affected by what he has done. He knows that he fired in justification; he realizes also that he has been initiated into the problem of the frontier and that he will have to kill again. His success in conducting himself nobly and honorably helps Deerslayer to face the other two problems in the book: the ordeal at the stake and the love of Judith Hutter. The first problem is of course concerned with Deerslayer's physical survival, and the several long efforts of Cooper to lend...
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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