In The Deerslayer - In The Deerslayer Cooper has succeeded admirably in achieving a unity of plot and setting and this achievement indicated

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Unformatted text preview: In The Deerslayer, Cooper has succeeded admirably in achieving a unity of plot and setting; and this achievement, indicated previously as one of the superiorities of the romance, has contributed greatly to the lasting importance of this last tale about Natty Bumppo's exploits. Stylistically, Cooper is at his strongest as a writer in two ways: the descriptions and the physical background, especially of Glimmerglass; and the scenes of action. The many, extensive passages about nature and the geography of the story are poetic and beautiful examples of Cooper's artistic strength. His descriptions, however, are not inserted only for artistic beauty; they are also the means by which he expresses his romantic love of nature, his philosophy about the natural settings, and his belief that man's fate is entwined intimately with all facets of the environment. While the story is admittedly man's fate is entwined intimately with all facets of the environment....
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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