Judith is perhaps the most tragic character in the story because of her return to a life of sin

Judith is perhaps the most tragic character in the story because of her return to a life of sin

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Unformatted text preview: Judith is perhaps the most tragic character in the story because of her return to a life of sin, as Cooper emphasizes at the end. In fact, the author calls attention to Judith's weaknesses: her love of luxury, her interest in fine clothes, and her attraction to the officers at the garrison. She is contrasted obviously and repeatedly with her sister, Hetty, who is Judith's superior in moral qualities. Nevertheless, Judith is depicted so realistically that she is one of Cooper's greatest successes in characterization throughout all his works. Judith's faults are certainly the cause for Deerslayer's rejection of her love and for his warnings to her about the need for reform. Judith is intelligent, proud, and independent; and these traits make her both appealing and unattractive. Her most unpleasant behavior occurs after Tom Hutter's death when Judith, pleased to learn that he is not her father, condemns him orally and tries to prevent his...
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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