The antithesis of Deerslayer from the first chapter to the last farewell after the battle

The antithesis of Deerslayer from the first chapter to the last farewell after the battle

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Unformatted text preview: The antithesis of Deerslayer from the first chapter to the last farewell after the battle, "Hurry" Harry March is the character who would best fulfill the classification of a villain for the book. He has, in fact, few redeeming traits although he leads the soldiers to the site of the Mingo camp. However, it is not entirely certain if Hurry Harry, angry at Judith and jealous of Deerslayer, would have gone directly to the garrison. The soldiers, hearing of the Mingo war party, met Hurry Harry on the trail, where he could not refuse to serve as a guide to Glimmerglass. Hurry Harry is subdued only twice (and temporarily) in The Deerslayer: His partner in crime, Tom Hutter, shows him in his dying moments the futility of a wicked life; and Hetty, dying serenely and confidently, admonishes him to "try and be more like Deerslayer." In certain ways, Deerslayer and Hurry Harry are alike: They are about the same age, are skillful...
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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