The fault for the disastrous turn of events is correctly placed upon Hurry Harry

The fault for the - The fault for the disastrous turn of events is correctly placed upon Hurry Harry He is clearly the villain of the novel because

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Unformatted text preview: The fault for the disastrous turn of events is correctly placed upon Hurry Harry. He is clearly the villain of the novel because his heartless (though technically innocent) murder of the Mingo girl has accentuated the downward trend of fortune for Deerslayer and the others. Hurry Harry's bragging and bravado also unfortunately influence the more cautious Tom Hutter. The primary cause of Hurry Harry's villainy or evil nature is the omission of a "moral sense," in Cooper's repeated phraseology. For example, Hurry Harry at the beginning of Chapter 19 callously blames Deerslayer for allowing himself to prowl about the Mingo camp and be captured. Ironically, Hurry Harry did exactly the same thing, and was rescued from captivity by Deerslayer, whom he now renounces. Hurry Harry is impetuous in his disregard of the signs and warnings about a Mingo ambush in Muskrat Castle, and...
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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