Retrieval - Retrieval:Getting Information Out 7. Contrast...

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Retrieval:Getting Information Out 7. Contrast recall, recognition, and relearning measures of memory. Recall is a measure of memory in which the person must retrieve information learned earlier, as on a fill-in-the-blank test. Recognition is a measure in which a person need only identify items previously learned, as on a multiple-choice test. Relearning is a memory measure that assesses the amount of time saved when relearning previously learned information. Tests of recognition and relearning reveal that we remember more than we recall. 1. Describe the importance of retrieval cues and the impact of environmental contexts and internal emotional states on retrieval. We can think of a memory as held in storage by a web of associations. To retrieve a specific memory, we need to identify one of the strands that leads to it, a process called priming. Activating retrieval cues within our web of associations aids memory. Retrieval is sometimes aided by returning to the original context. Sometimes, being in
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Retrieval - Retrieval:Getting Information Out 7. Contrast...

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