The Phenomenon of Memory

The Phenomenon of Memory - The Phenomenon of Memory 1....

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The Phenomenon of Memory 1. Describe memory in terms of information processing, and distinguish between sensory memory, short-term memory, and long-term memory. Our capacity for remembering countless faces, sounds, places, and events, including the formation of flashbulb memories, raises questions about how our memory system works. One helpful model of human memory is that of a computer-like information- processing system, such as the Atkinson-Shiffrin three-stage processing model. That is, to remember any event requires that we get information into our brain (encoding), retain it (storage), and later get it back out (retrieval). Sensory memory is the immediate, initial recording of sensory information in the memory system. Short-term memory, or our active working memory, holds a few items briefly, such as the seven digits of a phone number while dialing, before the information is stored or forgotten. Long-term memory is the relatively permanent and limitless storehouse of the memory system. Encoding: Getting Information In
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The Phenomenon of Memory - The Phenomenon of Memory 1....

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