INTRODUCTION - INTRODUCTION • maps are the main source of data for GIS • the traditions of cartography are fundamentally important to GIS •

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Unformatted text preview: INTRODUCTION • maps are the main source of data for GIS • the traditions of cartography are fundamentally important to GIS • GIS has roots in the analysis of information on maps, and overcomes many of the limitations of manual analysis • this unit is about cartography and its relationship to GIS - how does GIS differ from cartography, particularly automated cartography, which uses computers to make maps? WHAT IS A MAP? Definition • according to the International Cartographic Association, a map is: o a representation, normally to scale and on a flat medium, of a selection of material or abstract features on, or in relation to, the surface of the Earth Maps show more than the Earth's surface • the term "map" is often used in mathematics to convey the notion of transferring information from one form to another, just as cartographers transfer information from the surface of the Earth to a sheet of paper • the term "map" is used loosely to refer to any visual display of information, particularly if...
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course GEB 1011 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Broward College.

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INTRODUCTION - INTRODUCTION • maps are the main source of data for GIS • the traditions of cartography are fundamentally important to GIS •

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