MINDSETS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

MINDSETS OF MASS - MINDSETS OF MASS DESTRUCTION New Types of Post-Cold War Terrorists In the 1970s and 1980s it was commonly assumed that terrorist

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MINDSETS OF MASS DESTRUCTION New Types of Post-Cold War Terrorists In the 1970s and 1980s, it was commonly assumed that terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) would be counterproductive because such an act would be widely condemned. “Terrorists want a lot of people watching, not a lot of people dead,” Brian Jenkins (1975:15) opined. Jenkins’s premise was based on the assumption that terrorist behavior is normative, and that if they exceeded certain constraints and employed WMD they would completely alienate themselves from the public and possibly provoke swift and harsh retaliation. This assumption does seem to apply to certain secular terrorist groups. If a separatist organization such as the Provisional Irish Republic Army (PIRA) or the Basque Fatherland and Liberty (Euzkadi Ta Askatasuna—ETA), for example, were to use WMD, these groups would likely isolate their constituency and undermine sources of funding and political support. When the assumptions about terrorist
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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MINDSETS OF MASS - MINDSETS OF MASS DESTRUCTION New Types of Post-Cold War Terrorists In the 1970s and 1980s it was commonly assumed that terrorist

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