Cells1 - Cells organs and tissues of the immune system...

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Cells, organs and tissues of the immune system Myeloid cells Myeloid cells: antigen non-specific, accessory and effector cells These cells perform essential accessory functions in the activation of lymphocytes They are activated either by microbial components, cytokines or other mediators to become effector cells They also produce cytokines They have no memory What are the different types of Myeloid Cell? Dendritic cells; Monocytes/macrophages; Granulocytes/neutrophils/ polymorphonuclear leukocytes; Eosinophils, basophils and mast cells Dendritic Cells These are so-called because they have multiple projections “dendrites” Often found in non-lymphoid tissues but never in large numbers o They pick up antigen and carry it to lymphoid tissues. Their main role is as accessory cell in the activation of Th cells o Particularly on first exposure to a foreign antigen Monocytes/Macrophages These are the same cell but in different differentiation states: monocytes are present in the
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Cells1 - Cells organs and tissues of the immune system...

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