Cerebral and cerebellar tumours Treatment

Cerebral and cerebellar tumours Treatment - Cerebral and...

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Unformatted text preview: Cerebral and cerebellar tumours Treatment When a brain tumour is diagnosed, a medical team will be formed to assess the options of treatment presented by the leading surgeon to the patient and his/her family. Given the location of primary solid neoplasms of the brain in most cases there is no "do-nothing" option, neurosurgeons do take the time to observe the evolution of the neoplasm before proposing a management plan to the patient and his/her relatives. Different types of treatment are available to the doctors and can be combined to give the best chances of survival. Surgery plays a major part in the treatment of many brain tumours. Surgeons often remove a small portion of tumour for microscopic examination to identify its type and plan future treatment. Some benign tumours can be completely removed, hearing the patient. If a cure is not possible, surgery may still be used to reduce the bulk of the tumour, reducing the pressure on the brain and relieving symptoms. Some benign tumours that cannot be removed completely re-grow only very slowly; so surgery may well be an...
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Cerebral and cerebellar tumours Treatment - Cerebral and...

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