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continuous capillaries - continuous capillaries most common...

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continuous capillaries : most common type; abundant in skin & muscles endothelial cells joined by incomplete tight junctions – leave gaps between cells called intercellular clefts gaps large enough to allow fluids & small solutes to pass through in brain, tight junctions are complete (blood-brain barrier) o fenestrated capillaries : similar to continuous; some endothelial cells contain pores or fenestrations pores allow greater permeability to fluid & small solutes found where active absorption or filtration occurs (digestive system, kidneys) o sinusoidal capillaries (sinusoids) : highly modified, leaky capillaries found only in certain organs (liver, bone marrow, lymphoid tissue & endocrine organs) fenestrated with fewer tight junctions & larger intercellular clefts allow larger molecules (proteins, etc.) & blood cells to pass through phagocytes often aggregate around endothelial cells - Capillary Beds: o Microcirculation : flow of blood from arteriole to venule o capillary bed consists of:
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