Dementia - Dementia Dementia is a serious loss of cognitive...

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Dementia Dementia is a serious loss of cognitive ability in a previously unimpaired person, beyond what might be expected from normal aging. It may be static, the result of a unique global brain injury, or progressive, resulting in long-term decline due to damage or disease in the body. Although dementia is far more common in the geriatric population, it can occur before the age of 65, in which case it is termed early onset dementia. Presentation For dementia to be present there must be memory loss. In addition to this there must be one of the following four: Apraxia: problems with movements as evidenced by the drawing part of the MMSE Agnosia: problems in recognition e.g. faces, names etc of friends or relatives Aphasia: problems in speech or communication, either fluent or non-fluent Associated symptoms: e.g. problems planning Amnesia, apraxia, agnosia, aphasia and associated symptoms are the ‘5 As’ of dementia. In addition, there should be a decline in function over time and should cause problems in social or
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Dementia - Dementia Dementia is a serious loss of cognitive...

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