GI drugs Anti - GI drugs Anti-emetics Emesis is coordinated...

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GI drugs Anti-emetics Emesis is coordinated by the vomiting centre in the medulla, which receives inputs from the chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ) - not protected by the blood brain barrier so is susceptible to circulating drugs. Has many dopamine and 5HT receptors. The vomiting centre also receives inputs from the limbic system (hence why unpleasant sights and smells lead to vomiting), nucleus solitarus (involved in gag reflex), spinal cord (injury leads to nausea) and vestibular system (vertigo induced nausea). The vomiting centre itself has receptors for histamine and ACh, hence drugs that block these receptors and receptors on the CTZ are used to treat nausea and vomiting. Dopamine antagonists – can cause extra-pyramidal side effects (EPSEs) and sedation. Prochlorperizine (Stemetil) –also acts on 5HT and Histamine receptors Route/dose: 20mg PO (can also be given IM or PR). Can also be given as a 3mg dissolvable tablets that can be placed under lip (Buccastem) Good for post op, opioid and mild chemo induced nausea
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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GI drugs Anti - GI drugs Anti-emetics Emesis is coordinated...

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