Hearing - Hearing Theorganofhearing,theear,consists

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Hearing The organ of hearing, the ear, consists  of three major regions, shown in Figure  1. class="bullet"> •   The outer (external) ear consists of  the auricle (pinna), a flap of elastic  cartilage that protrudes from the head,  and the external auditory canal  (meatus), a tube that enters the  temporal bone. The canal is lined with  ceruminous glands that secrete  cerumen (earwax), a sticky substance  that traps dirt and other foreign objects.  The eardrum (tympanic membrane), at 
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the internal end of the external auditory  canal, vibrates in response to incident  sound waves. •   The middle ear (tympanic cavity) is  an air-filled cavity within the temporal  bone. It contains three small bones, the  auditory ossicles. These bones, called  the malleus, incus, and stapes, act as a  lever system that amplifies and  transfers vibrations of the eardrum to  the inner ear. The malleus at one end  connects to the eardrum, while the  stapes at the other end attaches with  ligaments to the oval window, a small,  membrane-covered opening into the 
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inner ear. Synovial joints connect the  incus, the center bone of the auditory  ossicles, to the malleus and stapes on 
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Hearing - Hearing Theorganofhearing,theear,consists

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