Herpes zoste1 - changes limited to a dermatome Later the...

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Herpes zoster Herpes Zoster, otherwise known as Shingles, is a viral disease characterised by a painful skin rash with blisters in a limited area on one side of the body, often in a stripe. Symptoms The earliest symptoms of Herpes Zoster include a headache, fever and malaise. These symptoms are typically followed by sensations of itching, burning, oversensitivity or paraesthesia in the affected dermatome. These symptoms may be mild or extremely severe depending on the dermatome affected. The symptoms can be mistaken for other pathologies including Myocardial Infarction, Renal Stones, Gall Stones or even Appendicitis, depending on the distribution of the pain. In most cases, after 1-2 days, the initial phase is followed by the appearance of the characteristic skin rash. The rash goes through several stages:- Initially the rash may be confused with hives, however unlike hives, herpes zoster causes skin
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Unformatted text preview: changes limited to a dermatome Later the rash becomes vesicular and forms small blisters filled with a serous exudate 3-7 days after the vesicles form, they begin to scab The scab should fall away within 14 days but should not be pulled away as this may leave scaring Occasionally the underlying skin will retain a degree of scaring and pigmentation Herpes zoster may have additional symptoms, depending on the dermatome involved. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus involves the orbit of the eye and occurs in approximately 1025% of cases. It is caused by the virus reactivating in the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. In a few patients, symptoms may include conjunctivitis, keratitis, uveitis, and optic nerve palsies that can sometimes cause chronic ocular inflammation, loss of vision, and debilitating pain....
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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