Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Anatomical aspects

Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Anatomical aspects

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Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Anatomical aspects Anatomical Aspects of Fractures or Dislocations of the Upper Limb The Clavicle The clavicle has two joints, the sterno-clavicular and the Acromio-Clavicluar joints. These can become dislocated or subluxated via forces in the coronal plane. Dislocations or subluxations of the sterno-clavicular joint can have two outcomes: A movement of the clavicular head forward (anterior) A movement of the clavicular head backwards (posterior) If the clavicular head moves anteriorly it will result in joint instability but no serious damage. If the clavicular head moves posteriorly it may impede on the subclavian vein causing reduced venous drainage from the affected arm, swelling and tissue damage. The AC joint is usually injured via a direct blow or fall taken on the shoulder, falling on an outstretched
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Unformatted text preview: arm can also injure the AC joint. There are three degrees of AC joint Injury: 1 st degree sprain 2 nd degree subluxation 3 rd degree dislocation Symptoms of AC joint injury: Pain o Localised over the top of the shoulder o Aggravated by shoulder movements and/or deep breathing Inflammation o Inflammation and bruising will be present at the site of injury o It is the result of torn ligament fibres Diagnosis: Made with X-ray - May show a separation or step deformity of the AC joint Occasionally the clavicle may break at the lateral end, proximal to the AC joint. Again diagnosis is made with X-ray....
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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