Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Elbow and wrist

Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Elbow and wrist

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Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Elbow and wrist Elbow Dislocation Dislocation of the elbow is relatively rare, however, if the elbow isn’t properly realigned the ulnar nerve may become trapped or damaged. Compression at the elbow, known as cubital tunnel syndrome, causes numbness in the small finger, half of the ring finger, and the back half of the hand over the small finger. Initially, the numbness is transient and usually occurs in the middle of the night or in the morning. The sensation is similar to hitting your "funny bone," but lasts a bit longer. Over time, the numbness is there all of the time, and weakness of the hand sets in. The "ulnar claw," or a position where the small and ring fingers curl up, occurs late in the disease and is a sign the nerve is severely affected. Elbow Fractures There are three bones at the elbow joint, and any combination of these bones may be involved in a fracture of the elbow. Patients who are able to fully extend their arm at the elbow are unlikely to have a fracture (98% certainty) and an X-ray is not required as long as an olecranon fracture is ruled out. An olecranon fracture is an injury to the most prominent bone of the elbow. The bone is actually the end
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Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Elbow and wrist

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