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Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Proximal humeral

Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Proximal humeral

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Injuries to bone and joints of the upper limb Proximal humeral There are four main types of proximal humeral fractures: Greater Tuberosity Head Anatomical Neck Surgical Neck Humeral Shaft Fractures Humeral shaft fractures occur in the diaphysis of the humerus. A potential complication of humeral shaft fractures is damage to the radial nerve. If the radial nerve is damaged it can’t act upon the extensor compartment of the forearm. If the extensor compartment of the forearm isn’t functional a patient will experience wrist drop. Distal humeral Supracondylar fractures are relatively rare in adults but are more common in children. A supracondylar fracture is a fracture which separated the distal end of the humerus from the shaft at the line that joins the medial and lateral epicondyles. The proximal fragment will usually be displaced anteriorly. This is particularly dangerous as nerves, arteries and veins are easily damaged in this region.
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