Klinefelter - Klinefelter's syndrome Epidemiology In humans...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Klinefelter's syndrome Epidemiology In humans, Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males and the second most common condition caused by the presence of extra chromosomes. The condition exists in roughly 1 out of every 1,000 males. One in every 500 males has an extra X chromosome but does not have the syndrome. Diagnosis In some cases there are no obvious symptoms of Klinefelter’s and as such is never diagnosed. Often cases are only diagnosed when a man undergoes investigation for fertility problems. If the condition is suspected, blood tests can identify the additional Chromosome/s. Treatment Klinefelter’s cannot be cured but the symptoms can be improved. Hormone replacement, testosterone, may be given at the time of puberty to some individuals who desire a more masculine appearance and identity. Testosterone stimulates growth of muscle bulk, facial and body hair. Testosterone can be administered by:- IM injections Tablets Subdermal implants
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

Klinefelter - Klinefelter's syndrome Epidemiology In humans...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online