Lumbar disc herniation Treatment

Lumbar disc herniation Treatment - Lumbar disc herniation...

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Lumbar disc herniation Treatment The majority of herniated discs will heal themselves in about six to twelve weeks and do not require any medical or surgical management. A course of physiotherapy can also help improve mobility and sped up recovery. Until the disc heal themselves it is recommended that patients remain active and do not restrict their movements, as this may cause stiffness and prolong symptoms. Analgesics and anti-inflammatories can be used to help reduce pain. NSAIDs such as ibuprofen or Diclofenac can be used to help reduce symptoms. Occasionally Extradural injections of corticosteroids can help but they are not recommended as a first line therapy. Most patients respond well to these treatments however in a small percentage of patients their pain may develop into chronic pain, of which around 1% will undergo surgery. Sciatica may or may not need treatment. As herniated discs usually dehydrate over a period of a few weeks the symptoms caused by herniated discs are likely to also disappear over a period of weeks. Physiotherapy and anti-inflammatories are usually advised as first line therapies. If these fail local steroid
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Lumbar disc herniation Treatment - Lumbar disc herniation...

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