Menorrhagia Treatment

Menorrhagia Treatment - used. Fibroids may respond to...

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Menorrhagia Treatment Where an underlying cause can be identified, treatment may be directed at this. Heavy periods around menarche and menopause will usually settle spontaneously without treatment. If the degree of bleeding is mild, all that may be sought by the woman is the reassurance that there is no sinister underlying cause. If anaemia occurs then iron tablets may be used to help restore normal haemoglobin levels. Menorrhagia is often treated with hormones, particularly as dysfunctional uterine bleeding commonly occurs in the early and late menstrual years when contraception is also sought. The oral combination pill or progesterone only pills may be taken for a few months, but for longer-term treatment the alternatives of injected Depo Provera or the more recent progesterone releasing IntraUterine System (IUS) may be
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Unformatted text preview: used. Fibroids may respond to hormonal treatment, and if they do not, then surgical removal may be required. NSAIDs such as mefenamic acid, naproxen, ibuprofen and diclofenac may help to reduce dysmenorrhoea and can also reduce blood lost in some people. Tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic, inhibits the dissolution of thrombosis that leads to menstrual flow. It can reduce flow by up to 50% although there is little correlation between the extent of reduced flow and patient satisfaction. In the few patients whose problems cannot be controlled by one of the above means, surgical procedures to remove fibroids and ablate areas of the endometrium are available but in recent years they have fallen in favour....
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