Respiratory drugs - Respiratory drugs This article outlines...

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Respiratory drugs This article outlines some of the major drugs used in respiratory conditions. It is worth noting that these are based on UK guidelines and other standards of practice will exist internationally. Bronchodilators Beta 2 agonists: These stimulate airway beta 2 adreno-receptors to cause bronchodilation. Relax smooth muscle by increasing cAMP. Short-acting: Salbutamol – inhaled prn up to qds for chronic asthma. Give as nebuliser (2.5-5mg qds 4hrly) in acute. If life-threatening can increase nebs to once every 15minutes or switch to IV. Long-acting: Salmeterol – 50-100micrograms bd inhaler Used in acute and chronic asthma. Also in hyperkalaemia (prn nebs) and premature labour (IV – also acts to relax uterine smooth muscle) Side Effects: Fine tremor, headache, tachycardia , palpitations, hypokalaemia, paradoxical bronchospasm. Contraindications: nil Caution: arrhythmias, DM (monitor glucose, can cause DKAs), hyperthyroidism Interactions: methyldopa – increased risk of severe hypotension Monitor: Potassium and glucose especially if IV or high dose.
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Xanthines: Theophylline Acts via an unknown mechanism, theories include: increasing cAMP, adenosine antagonism and reduction in diaphragm fatigue. Used in
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Respiratory drugs - Respiratory drugs This article outlines...

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