Temporal arteritis Epidemiology

Temporal arteritis Epidemiology - Temporal arteritis...

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Temporal arteritis Epidemiology Temporal arteritis almost always affects people over the age of 50, with the average age of onset around the age of 70. It is at least twice as common in women than men. The incidence of temporal arteritis varies in different areas of the world. In northern Europe the incidence is around 20 cases per 100,000 people aged over 50. Diagnosis A diagnosis of temporal arteritis is made using the following:- Physical Examination o Palpation of the head reveals prominent temporal arteries with or without pulsation o The temporal area may be tender o Decreased pulses may be found throughout the body o Evidence of ischemia may be noted on fundal exam Laboratory tests o Blood tests may show a mild anaemia o ESR is likely to be raised o CRP is also likely to be raised Biopsy o The gold standard for diagnosing temporal arteritis is biopsy, which involves removing a small part of the vessel and examining it microscopically for giant cells infiltrating the tissue
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Temporal arteritis Epidemiology - Temporal arteritis...

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