The Nervous Syste2

The Nervous Syste2 - the two hemispheres The left hemisphere is thought to be the dominant analytical hemisphere and the right hemisphere is

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The Nervous System Diencephalon The diencephalon consists of the thalamus (main sensory relay center), epithalamus (the pineal body may play a role in sexual maturation), and hypothalamus (important in maintaining homeostasis). Cerebrum The cerebrum has two hemispheres divided into lobes. The lobes are the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal. Many CNS functions can be localized to specific areas of the cortex. Association areas are involved in the recognition of information. Speech involves the sensory speech area, the motor speech area, and the interactions between them and other cortical areas. An EEG monitors brain waves, which are a summation of the electrical activity of the brain. Memory consists of sensory (less than 1 s), short-term (lasting a few minutes), and long-term (permanent) memory. Each hemisphere controls the opposite half of the body. Commissures connect
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Unformatted text preview: the two hemispheres. The left hemisphere is thought to be the dominant analytical hemisphere, and the right hemisphere is thought to be dominant for spatial perception and musical ability. • The basal nuclei inhibit extraneous muscular activity. • The limbic system is located deep within the cerebrum and is involved with the emotional and visceral response to smell, as well as other visceral functions. Cerebellum • The cerebellum is involved in balance and muscle coordination. Its main function is as a comparator, comparing the intended action with what is occurring and modifying the action of lower motor neurons to eliminate differences. Spinal Cord • The spinal cord has a central gray part organized into horns and a peripheral white part forming nerve tracts. • Roots of spinal nerves extend out of the cord....
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANTHRO 2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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